SLIDESHOW: A Day for the Birds

With National Bird Day coming up this Saturday, we've put together a brief slideshow celebrating our fowl friends.

Upland Sandpiper

The Upland Sandpiper is a bit disproportioned, with a head that appears too small for its much larger body. But that doesn't seem to slow this bird down - the upland sandpiper migrates all the way from Argentina and Uruguay to the northern Great Plains.

Brown Pelican

The use of pesticides also took its toll on the Brown Pelican, as eating contaminated fish led to a population decline. But as DDT use in the U.S. ended and sanctuaries were established, the Brown Pelican recovered. In November of 2009, they were removed from the Endangered Species list.

Anhinga

The Anhinga is a darter - the only one in the Americas. It hunts by diving underwater and impaling fish with its long, thin, pointed beak.

Green Violet-ear Hummingbird

The Green Violet-ear Hummingbird tends to be quite solitary. Even its song is unique to each individual bird, though there are more song similarities between birds that nest near each other.

Peregrine Falcon

Due to pesticide use, Peregrine Falcon populations plummeted by an estimated 80% in North America and Europe. But thanks to conservation efforts, Peregrines have rebounded to their former numbers and EDF staffers are lucky enough to get to watch a nesting pair right outside our San Francisco offices.

Burrowing Owl

While most owls are known for being nocturnal, the Burrowing Owl is often active throughout the whole day. Their unique, rectangular shape and long legs makes it easy to distinguish them from other owls.

Ruddy Turnstone

The Ruddy Turnstone can be found on coastlines all over the world. This bird gets its name from its unique foraging style of flipping over small rocks to find food.

Bald Eagle

In the 1960s, there were only about 1,000 Bald Eagles in the continental U.S. But after EDF's founding and the ban on DDT in the U.S. market, this iconic bird has bounced back and is no longer endangered.

Western Meadowlark

The Eastern and Western Meadowlark look so much alike that they are almost indistinguishable, but it is their calls that set them apart. While the Eastern Meadowlark has a simple, distinctive two-note song, the Western Meadowlark is far more musical.

Protect birds & other wildlife by becoming a monthly donor today

Thanks to the support of dedicated people like you, we can continue to make a difference.

Protect birds & other wildlife by becoming a monthly donor today

Thanks to the support of dedicated people like you, we can continue to make a difference.